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Contact

You can contact me via email (ninewcombe@gmail.com). I welcome them, I absolutely adore them and I will always read and reply to them. If you have writing-related queries or requests for posts or want to recommend a book, go right ahead! If you just want to chat, chat away! There's a form on the sidebar that you can use or you can email me directly - they'll both get to me!

A quick summary of this page.
Top posts and links
Review policy
Promotions and giveaway policy


New to nindogs? Here are some top posts!
Honey, I've Got a Non-Teen YA Protagonist (Or, "Mum, 
Dad, I'm Moving in With a 907 Year Old Time Lord")

In Which I Review White Cat

LEGEND: Catch Me If You Can Meets The Hunger Games (Or, Vigilantes, Prodigies and Dystopia: an Interview Debut Author Marie Lu)

Are You Feeling Anything Yet? (Or, Cheers to These Teenage Years and How to Portray Them So You Don't Piss Us Off)

Show Me Yours, a Blogfest

"Don't you dare try and twist my words around and make yourself seem like you're not a backstabbing, two-faced bitch." (Or, How to Argue)

I highly recommend the wonderful Aimee L Salter who is fantastic and was so kind to write a post about me on her blog Seeking the Write Life.

(A tweet from the stunning Holly Black which made my life when I saw it.)


Review policy:
I accept a limited amount of books for review, though I love to host interviews alongside reviews on the site. My living in Australia does pose postal issues, but I also accept review copies in .epub format. I am willing to consider self-published books.

Currently, I consider the following subgenres of YA books:
  • Urban Fantasy
  • Fantasy 
  • Dystopian 
  • Science Fiction 
  • Adventure/Action 
  • Crime/Thriller/Mystery 
  • Debut authors
I am unable to accept books in the following genres:
  • Nonfiction 
  • Memoirs 
  • Chick lit 
  • Political/satirical 
  • Self-help 
  • Poetry 
  • Contemporary YA 
If you don't see the genre of your book in the lists above, please email me for more details.

In regard to series: I don't read series out of order, and therefore, if you have a review request for a series that I haven't read, I do ask that you also provide me with its antecedents, allowing for a more effective analysis of series trajectory and character maturation. Or be aware of this when you request, as it is possible I have read the previous books.

I try to respond within 30 days to each personalised review request, permitting it falls within the genres of books as listed above. I cannot, however, guarantee a response for mass emails or books in genres I do not review. If you would like to send a personalised follow-up email if you've not heard back from me after this 30-day period, that is perfectly fine.

I cannot guarantee I will be able to finish and/or review every book I accept for review. Novels which I have requested personally will take precedence, followed by those accepted through a request/pitch, and then those which have my interest.

For ARC copies, I also try and review in the month before its release. If for some reason I feel that I won't be able to finish your book, I will try to email you and pass it on through a review program or to a blogger whom I believe would be a better fit.

My Reviews:
I do endeavour to critically analyse and gauge my perception of the book in regard to the current YA industry. My reviews, though analytical, do have a casual air, and can be snarky or absurd.

My acceptance of a book for review does not mean that I will give it a good rating, that I firmly state to uphold my integrity as a reader, a book reviewer and a blogger. I write honest reviews and provide constructive criticisms, and sometimes, defacing comments. My thoughts and feelings about a novel are also a big part of my reviews.

Besides here, I also post my reviews on Goodreads, and, if you request, elsewhere.


Promotions:
I love to have interviews, guest posts and/or giveaways. For promotion, I do prefer to have read your book beforehand or to be included on an ARC list. 

I do reserve the right to choose who and what I support on this blog, and so I hope you can respect any decision I make should I choose not to participate in something. That said, I'll probably accept.


Giveaway Policy:
This is a general posting for all giveaways hosted on this site.
  • You must be 13 years or older to participate in a giveaway, unless it is otherwise stated that you must be older.
  • Nindogs is not responsible for items lost in shipping or items shipped from third party sponsors.
  • Winners will be chosen randomly using Random.org
  • You must be a follower to participate in all giveaways.
  • Winners will be contacted via email and there will always be a blog post dedicated to announcing said winners.
  • There is no limit to how many different giveaways you may enter, but you may only enter each giveaway once. If there are additional entries to be earned, they will be specifically outlined in the giveaway information.
  • I hold the right to disqualify entrants without notification, so please pay attention to the guidelines of each giveaway.

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"In 900 Years of Time and Space, I've Never Met Anyone Who Wasn't Important Before" (Problem: Boring Lead, Riveting Supporting Cast)

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But today, I want to talk about healthy creative environments.

So, at the moment, I'm on the floor in my living room, more from my uncanny ability to sit cross-legged for extended periods of time and the fact that I just spent the better part of a year extricated from my family in HSC mode (and I'm attempting to quash complaints that they never see me despite my nearly always being home). That, and the wifi conks out on…